ELT by M Amin Gental

ESL EFL ELT

Assessment for the Language Classroom – Q&A Session — March 3, 2017

Assessment for the Language Classroom – Q&A Session

Oxford University Press

proofreading for English language students in EAPProfessor Anthony Green is Director of the Centre for Research in English Language Learning and Assessment at the University of Bedfordshire. He is a Past  President of the International Language Testing Association (ILTA). He has published on language assessment and in his most recent book Exploring Language Assessment and Testing (Routledge, 2014) provides teachers with an introduction to this field. Professor Green’s main research interests are teaching, learning, and assessment. Today, we share some of the questions and answers asked of Tony during his recent webinar, Assessment for the Language Classroom.

Should placement tests be given without students’ doing any preparation so that we can see their natural level in English?

Ideally, placement tests should not need any special preparation. The format and types of question on the test should be straightforward so that all students can understand what they need to do.

How should the feedback from progress tests…

View original post 1,184 more words

#WorldBookDay – 5 steps to becoming an effective storyteller —

#WorldBookDay – 5 steps to becoming an effective storyteller

Oxford University Press

shutterstock_357633884Gareth Davies is a writer, teacher, teacher trainer, and storyteller. He has been in the ELT industry for 21 years teaching in Portugal, the UK, Spain and the Czech Republic. Since 2005 he has worked closely with Oxford University Press, delivering teacher training and developing materials. Today, to celebrate World Book Day, he joins us to discuss why being an effective storyteller matters in the EFL classroom, and how you can employ tactics to become a better storyteller yourself.

Extensive reading, the idea of reading for pleasure and not just as a school subject is believed to have wide ranging benefits. Professor Richard Day claims that Extensive Reading not only improves students reading skills but it also improves their vocabulary skills, their grammar skills, their listening and speaking skills. But how do we get our students interested in reading for pleasure. It’s the teacher’s job to motivate and facilitate reading…

View original post 628 more words

EMI (and CLIL) – a growing global trend — February 2, 2017

EMI (and CLIL) – a growing global trend

Oxford University Press

MOBURF-00002371-001Julie Dearden is Head of English Medium Instruction at the University of Oxford’s Hertford College, developing and teaching professional development programmes for teachers and university lecturers around the world.

Across the world, an educational trend is becoming increasingly popular. Subjects such as Science, Maths, Geography and Economics are being taught through the medium of English – known as English Medium Instruction, or EMI.

My definition of EMI is: “The use of the English language to teach academic subjects (other than English itself) in countries or jurisdictions in which the majority of the population’s first language is not English”. (Dearden, 2015)

EMI started at tertiary level in universities seeking to ‘internationalise’ their education offer. They wanted to attract students from abroad, prepare their home students to study and work abroad, publish in English and survive in an increasingly competitive education market-place – and still do!

Why EMI?

There seem to be…

View original post 524 more words

Extensive Reading and Language Learning — January 11, 2017

Extensive Reading and Language Learning

Oxford University Press

oup_54206Dr. Richard R. Day is a Professor at the Department of Second Language Studies, University of Hawaii. He has authored numerous publications, particularly on second language reading, including Bringing Extensive Reading into the Classroom (co-author).

Extensive reading is based on the well-established premise that we learn to read by reading. This is true for learning to read our first language as well as foreign languages. In teaching foreign language reading, an extensive reading approach allows students to read, read, and read some more.

When EFL students read extensively, they become fluent readers. But there is more. Studies have established that EFL students increase their vocabulary, and become better writers. We also know that reading extensively helps increase oral fluency—listening and speaking abilities. Finally, students who read a lot develop positive attitudes toward reading and increased motivation to study English. So there are some excellent reasons for having EFL students reading…

View original post 600 more words

Making the ‘Impossible’ Possible – How to get your students writing — January 9, 2017

Making the ‘Impossible’ Possible – How to get your students writing

Oxford University Press

shutterstock_176605295

Gareth Davies is a writer, teacher, teacher trainer, and storyteller. He has been in the ELT industry for 21 years teaching in Portugal, the UK, Spain and the Czech Republic. Since 2005 he has worked closely with Oxford University Press, delivering teacher training and developing materials. Gareth joins us today to preview his webinar ‘Making the Impossible Possible… How to get your students writing’.

Writing’s a Chore?

When I was on a recent short-term teaching assignment in Northern Spain, I decided to ask my students to do some creative writing. I gave them some prompts and asked them to write a story. Far from being a joyous activity, the students rolled their eyes. There was a lot of grumbling and sighing and the finished versions were no more than four or five lines long. They had written stories, but they had not written creatively. Why did my students have such…

View original post 896 more words

Back to School Activities for your EFL Classroom — January 5, 2017

Back to School Activities for your EFL Classroom

Oxford University Press

shutterstock_275971190Happy New Year! To celebrate another successful year ahead of language learning, and to welcome you and your students back to class, we asked three of our former contributors Vanessa Esteves, Christopher Graham, and Julietta Schoenmann to devise a series of lesson plans and activity worksheets for your EFL classrooms. From adult through to primary, enjoy these mixed-level and mixed ability free resources as a gift from Oxford University Press this January.

Have a productive, fun and inspiring year!

Primary Level

Lesson Plan

Activity Worksheet

Secondary Level

Lesson Plan

Activity Worksheet

Tertiary/Adult Level

Lesson Plan

Activity Worksheet

View original post

21st Century Skills and the Path to Fluency — December 15, 2016

21st Century Skills and the Path to Fluency

Oxford University Press

Students Talking In A ClassroomKathleen Kampa and Charles Vilina are American ELT authors and teacher-trainers who have taught young learners in Japan for 25 years. They are co-authors of Magic Time, Everybody Up, and Oxford Discover, courses for young learners published by Oxford University Press. Kathleen and Charles are active teachers who promote an inquiry-based approach to learning, where students develop English language fluency as they discover the world around them.

The Partnership for 21st Century Learning in Washington D.C. strongly endorses the development of 21st century skills in modern education.[1] This coalition of educators and business leaders has created a framework of skills considered to be essential for a student’s future success in the 21st century.

Along with strong content knowledge and interdisciplinary themes, the Partnership stresses the need for the following “learning and innovation skills” among students to prepare them for the future:

21stcskills1

Though originally…

View original post 675 more words

The AppVent Calendar 2016: All The Best Educational Apps From The Past Year. — December 9, 2016

The AppVent Calendar 2016: All The Best Educational Apps From The Past Year.

EDTECH 4 BEGINNERS

EDTECH4BEGINNERS presents…

AppVent Calendar 2016 - Best Educational Apps Of The Year


Create

6) ThingLink lets you add interactivity to an image with ease.  Choose a picture and then mark hot-spots.  When the hot-spot it is tapped, the video or text you have input will pop-up.

16) Canva – simply the most amazing app for graphic design.  Posters have never looked so good!

13) Bossjock supports pupils with sound recording and editing clips.  Easy-to-use and intuitive, the app is fantastic for making podcasts and radio shows.

23) Paper and Pencil by 53.  Simply an excellent art app in which sketches, paintings and image editing can be completed.


Collaborate

22) Padlet is such a great way to promote co-operation in the classroom.  A virtual wall is set up by the teacher and then the link shared.  Children can post questions, answer questions, submit work, comment on peers’ achievements; the possibilities are endless.

18) Google Docs has allowed for easy but…

View original post 609 more words

Chatting in the academy: exploring spoken English for academic purposes (Mike McCarthy) — December 5, 2016

Chatting in the academy: exploring spoken English for academic purposes (Mike McCarthy)

Lizzie Pinard

Another addition to my collection of write-ups based on the talks recorded by IATEFL Online and stored on the website for everybody to access. What a wonderful resource! This one is by Michael McCarthy, and, as you would expect, is based on corpora and vocabulary – this time in the context of academic spoken English… 

MM starts by saying it is easier to study academic English in its written form and much more challenging in its spoken forms. His main point is that there is no one single thing that we can call Spoken Academic English. His talk will draw on information from corpora and show how it can be used in materials. He is going to use a corpus of lectures, seminars, supervisions and tutorials from the humanities and the sciences, the ACAD, and a sub-corpus the Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English, MICASE. He is also going…

View original post 1,310 more words

Using YouTube as a corpus: inviting everyone to my IATEFL BESIG workshop —

Using YouTube as a corpus: inviting everyone to my IATEFL BESIG workshop

ELT stories

Hello everyone!

This Saturday I’m doing a workshop for IATEFL BESIG on using YouTube as a corpus of spoken English. 

Below is the abstract – if the topic seems interesting, you’re very welcome to take part! You’ll find the link to access the workshop on the BESIG website here.

besig-workshop

Abstract. YouTube is a vast source of subtitled spoken English ranging from general to business to ESP, and it has long been an extremely valuable source of authentic video in the business English classroom. Moreover, as technology develops, there appear new ways of using this resource for language learning, and so its pedagogic value keeps growing.

In particular, recently there have started to appear tools that, to a certain extent, allow to access YouTube as a corpus, i.e. find examples of use of specific lexical expressions and grammar. In this workshop I will overview some of these tools and then…

View original post 60 more words