ELT by M Amin Gental

ESL EFL ELT

21st Century Skills and the Path to Fluency — December 15, 2016

21st Century Skills and the Path to Fluency

Oxford University Press

Students Talking In A ClassroomKathleen Kampa and Charles Vilina are American ELT authors and teacher-trainers who have taught young learners in Japan for 25 years. They are co-authors of Magic Time, Everybody Up, and Oxford Discover, courses for young learners published by Oxford University Press. Kathleen and Charles are active teachers who promote an inquiry-based approach to learning, where students develop English language fluency as they discover the world around them.

The Partnership for 21st Century Learning in Washington D.C. strongly endorses the development of 21st century skills in modern education.[1] This coalition of educators and business leaders has created a framework of skills considered to be essential for a student’s future success in the 21st century.

Along with strong content knowledge and interdisciplinary themes, the Partnership stresses the need for the following “learning and innovation skills” among students to prepare them for the future:

21stcskills1

Though originally…

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The AppVent Calendar 2016: All The Best Educational Apps From The Past Year. — December 9, 2016

The AppVent Calendar 2016: All The Best Educational Apps From The Past Year.

EDTECH 4 BEGINNERS

EDTECH4BEGINNERS presents…

AppVent Calendar 2016 - Best Educational Apps Of The Year


Create

6) ThingLink lets you add interactivity to an image with ease.  Choose a picture and then mark hot-spots.  When the hot-spot it is tapped, the video or text you have input will pop-up.

16) Canva – simply the most amazing app for graphic design.  Posters have never looked so good!

13) Bossjock supports pupils with sound recording and editing clips.  Easy-to-use and intuitive, the app is fantastic for making podcasts and radio shows.

23) Paper and Pencil by 53.  Simply an excellent art app in which sketches, paintings and image editing can be completed.


Collaborate

22) Padlet is such a great way to promote co-operation in the classroom.  A virtual wall is set up by the teacher and then the link shared.  Children can post questions, answer questions, submit work, comment on peers’ achievements; the possibilities are endless.

18) Google Docs has allowed for easy but…

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Chatting in the academy: exploring spoken English for academic purposes (Mike McCarthy) — December 5, 2016

Chatting in the academy: exploring spoken English for academic purposes (Mike McCarthy)

Lizzie Pinard

Another addition to my collection of write-ups based on the talks recorded by IATEFL Online and stored on the website for everybody to access. What a wonderful resource! This one is by Michael McCarthy, and, as you would expect, is based on corpora and vocabulary – this time in the context of academic spoken English… 

MM starts by saying it is easier to study academic English in its written form and much more challenging in its spoken forms. His main point is that there is no one single thing that we can call Spoken Academic English. His talk will draw on information from corpora and show how it can be used in materials. He is going to use a corpus of lectures, seminars, supervisions and tutorials from the humanities and the sciences, the ACAD, and a sub-corpus the Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English, MICASE. He is also going…

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Using YouTube as a corpus: inviting everyone to my IATEFL BESIG workshop —

Using YouTube as a corpus: inviting everyone to my IATEFL BESIG workshop

ELT stories

Hello everyone!

This Saturday I’m doing a workshop for IATEFL BESIG on using YouTube as a corpus of spoken English. 

Below is the abstract – if the topic seems interesting, you’re very welcome to take part! You’ll find the link to access the workshop on the BESIG website here.

besig-workshop

Abstract. YouTube is a vast source of subtitled spoken English ranging from general to business to ESP, and it has long been an extremely valuable source of authentic video in the business English classroom. Moreover, as technology develops, there appear new ways of using this resource for language learning, and so its pedagogic value keeps growing.

In particular, recently there have started to appear tools that, to a certain extent, allow to access YouTube as a corpus, i.e. find examples of use of specific lexical expressions and grammar. In this workshop I will overview some of these tools and then…

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